Installing Arduino on Ubuntu 12.10

One of the great things about the Arduino software is the fact that it is created in Java and can run on both Windows and Linux.

This tutorial shows how to get Arduino up and running on a computer running Ubuntu Linux.

Arduino and Ubuntu Linux are a great combination. Even on my old hardware!

Arduino and Ubuntu Linux are a great combination. Even on my old hardware!

Install the Arduino package

At the command prompt, type the following and press enter:

sudo apt-get install arduino

Once this is installed, you should be able to open it up by searching for it in the Ubuntu Dashboard  menu or you can type arduino at the command prompt.

At this point, you will see the familiar Arduino interface and some menu options in the window (although they may be very faint like in my screenshot).

Getting the Serial communication up and running

In order to program your Arduino, you will need to establish the proper permissions for serial communications via the USB port.
By default, ordinary users on the Linux system do no have permissions to communicate with the serial port unless you are a member of the “dialout” group.

To add yourself to the dialout group, type the following at the command prompt and press ENTER:

sudo usermod -a -G dialout yourusename

For the changes to  take effect, you will need to log out and log back in again.  Once you log back in, you can enter the groups command.  You should now see yourself as a member of the dialout group.

Notice the menu is barely visible here?  We change this by editing the /usr/bin/arduino script.

Notice the menu is barely visible here? We change this by editing the /usr/bin/arduino script.

<img class="size-medium wp-image-147 " alt="After editing the /usr/bin/arduino script, you'll notice the menu has the native Arduino look and feel. " src="https://www.mycontraption.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/Screenshot-from-2013-04-06-23_07_40-250×300.png" width="250" height="300" srcset="https://mycontraption check this link right here now.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/Screenshot-from-2013-04-06-23_07_40-250×300.png 250w, https://mycontraption.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/Screenshot-from-2013-04-06-23_07_40.png 500w” sizes=”(max-width: 250px) 100vw, 250px” />

After editing the /usr/bin/arduino script, you’ll notice the menu has the native Arduino look and feel.

Changing the Look and Feel

At this point you should have a fully functioning connection between your Arduino and your computer. There are some improvements you can make to the look and feel by editing the /usr/bin/arduino script.

sudo nano /usr/bin/arduino

Comment out the last line in the file…The one that looks like this:

java -Dswing.defaultlaf=com.sun.java.swing.plaf.gtk.GTKLookAndFeel processing.app.Base

Then, add the following line:

java processing.app.Base

Press CTRL-X to save and exit

Editing the /usr/bin/arduino file will fix the menu visibility issue.

Editing the /usr/bin/arduino file will fix the menu visibility issue.

What this essentially does is uses the Arduino look and feel instead of the GTK version.

Well, that about does it for this tutorial. If you have any comments or questions, feel free to leave them below. And don’t forget to use the bookmark links below!

3 Comments



  1. I use Ubuntu pretty much exclusively for my “development.” I just looked it up in the software center and it installed itself. There was some weirdness when I tried to program an ATtiny with my Uno, but I eventually got it going as I wrote about here: http://www.jcopro.net/2013/02/18/getting-started-with-the-attiny85-chip/ – I generally run it directly off of my desktop now, but I suspect that the “software center” setup did something to allow it to run things correctly after some trial and error.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *